Agnate in a sentence

The word "agnate" in a example sentences. Learn the definition of agnate and how to use it in a sentence.

This website focus on english words and example sentences, so everyone can learn how to use them. Easily browse through english vocabulary, listen the sentences or copy them.

Definition of Agnate

  • Related or akin by the father's side; also, sprung from the same male ancestor; as, agnate brother: a brother having the same father, but a different mother; in ths sense it is a correlative of uterine.
  • Allied; akin.
  • A relative whose relationship can be traced exclusively through males.
  • one related on the father's side

How to use agnate in a sentence. Agnate pronunciation.

It was enacted[174] that all the children should be called to the estate, whether they had been under the power of the testator at the time of his death or not; and female relatives were now allowed to come in for their share "in the third degree," that is, if there was neither a child or an agnate surviving.
play
copy
This was not much of an improvement; and the principle of agnate succession is the only point in which Roman law failed to give to women those equal rights which it allowed them in other cases.
play
copy
Under the old law, as we have seen, a son and a daughter had equal rights to intestate succession; but beyond the relationship of daughter to father or sister to brother women had no rights to intestate succession unless there were no agnates, that is, male relatives on the father's side.
play
copy
All these insignia probably belonged on their first emergence only to the nobility proper, i. e. to the agnate descendants of curule magistrates; although, after the manner of such decorations, all of them in course of time were extended to a wider circle.
play
copy
Associated Words: affiliate, affiliation, filiation, patricide, patricidal, paternalism, parricide, agnate, agnation, patrimony. father, v. beget, engender, procreate. fatherhood n. paternity.
play
copy

Examples of Agnate

Example #1
This was not much of an improvement; and the principle of agnate succession is the only point in which Roman law failed to give to women those equal rights which it allowed them in other cases.
Example #2
In the days of the Empire some attempts were made to be more just.
Example #3
It was enacted[174] that all the children should be called to the estate, whether they had been under the power of the testator at the time of his death or not; and female relatives were now allowed to come in for their share "in the third degree," that is, if there was neither a child or an agnate surviving.
Example #4
Thus, an aunt would not be called to the estate of a nephew who died childless, but the uncle was regularly admitted.
Example #5
So, too, a nephew was admitted to the intestate succession of an uncle, who died without issue, but the niece was shut out.