British in a sentence

The word "british" in a example sentences. Learn the definition of british and how to use it in a sentence.

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Definition of British

  • Of or pertaining to Great Britain or to its inhabitants; -- sometimes restricted to the original inhabitants.
  • People of Great Britain.
  • the people of Great Britain
  • of or relating to or characteristic of Great Britain or its people or culture

How to use british in a sentence. British pronunciation.

When he had brought the influence of the British Consulate to bear, promises were made, doors were opened wide, and Pasha and Bey offered him coffee and talked to him sympathetically.
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He had come in a Quaker suit of black broadcloth, with grey steel buttons, and a plain white stock; and he wore his broad-brimmed hat-to the consternation of the British Consul-General and the Europeans present, to the amazement of the Turkish and native officials, who eyed him keenly.
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Foreign Subscriptions Our agent for British subscriptions is B. H. Blackwell, Broad Street, Oxford, ENGLAND.
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It is interesting to compare stories of American garrisons, or such clever novels as Mrs. Diver's trilogy of British army posts in India, with the awful revelations made by Kuprin.
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There truly she was, and the British Queen bore down upon them.
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While there he showed me a very large gold medal he had received from the British government for saving a ship's company at sea.
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Six miles below town a fat and battered brick chimney, sticking above the magnolias and live-oaks, was pointed out as the monument erected by an appreciative nation to celebrate the battle of New Orleans-Jackson's victory over the British, January 8, 1815.
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Mrs. Damerel stood like a statue of British respectability, deaf and blind to everything that conflicts with good-breeding; stony-faced, she had set her lips in the smile appropriate to one who is braving torture.
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Thomas Tyler Throughout the eighties at least, and probably for some years before, the British Museum reading room was used daily by a gentleman of such astonishing and crushing ugliness that no one who had once seen him could ever thereafter forget him.
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My reason for this is that Mr Harris wrote a play about Shakespear and Mary Fitton; and when I, as a pious duty to Tyler's ghost, reminded the world that it was to Tyler we owed the Fitton theory, Frank Harris, who clearly had not a notion of what had first put Mary into his head, believed, I think, that I had invented Tyler expressly for his discomfiture; for the stress I laid on Tyler's claims must have seemed unaccountable and perhaps malicious on the assumption that he was to me a mere name among the thousands of names in the British Museum catalogue.
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John Stuart Mill told our British workmen that they were mostly liars.
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He might have been jilted by ten dark ladies and been none the worse for it; but his treatment by the British Public was another matter.
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They reviled the British Public, and never forgave it for ignoring their best work and admiring their splendid commonplaces; but they produced the commonplaces all the same, and made them sound magnificent by mere brute faculty for their art.
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We understand that our more enterprising contemporaries have no intention of allowing this question to remain unanswered, and the wildest rumours are afloat as to the nature of the gifts which will be offered next year to annual subscribers by various British journals.
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This he did, asking that the British consul, with the employees of the cable company, be permitted to return from El Caney to the city.
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On the morning of June 17th, 1775, a force of British soldiers attacked a small body of raw, ill-equipped American volunteers, who had fortified a hill near Boston, and quickly drove them from their position.
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No, but by proud descendants of the vanquished, whose broader view showed them the incalculable benefits arising from that seeming defeat, which precipitated the great struggle, forcing every man in the Colonies to take a position squarely for or against the American Cause, convinced the timid that only proper equipment would be needed to enable the American army to hold its own against the foe, and taught the British that they were dealing, not with hot-headed rebels who would run at first sight of the dreaded "red coats", but with patriots who would stand their ground so long as a charge of powder remained, or gunstocks could be handled as clubs.
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In preparing this history a number of private libraries, the collections of the Georgia Historical Society, the Congressional Library, the British Museum, were searched for data, but so little was found that the story, in so far as it relates to the Moravian settlement, has been drawn entirely from the original manuscripts in the Archives of the Unitas Fratrum at Herrnhut, Germany, with some additions from the Archives at Bethlehem, Pa., and Salem, N. C.
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The charter granted to them "all those lands, countries, and territories situate, lying and being in that part of South Carolina, in America" between the Savannah and Altamaha, gave them permission to take over any British subjects, or foreigners willing to become such, and guaranteed to each settler the rights of an English subject, and full liberty of conscience,-Papists alone excepted.
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Then weeks were consumed in the mere effort to get away from the British Isles, the breeze sometimes permitting the small sailing vessels to slip from one port to another, and then holding them prisoner for days before another mile could be gained.
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Examples of British

Example #1
They had respect for him more than for most Franks, because the Prince Pasha had honoured him with especial favour.
Example #2
David had not yet been fortunate with his own business-the settlement of his Uncle Benn's estate-though the last stages of negotiation with the Prince Pasha seemed to have been reached.
Example #3
They themselves wore red tarbooshes, as did the Prince; yet all of them knew that the European custom of showing respect was by doffing the hat.
Example #4
He drew himself up with dignity, his face became graver.
Example #5
Because the publications are issued without profit it will be impossible to allow discounts to libraries, agents, or booksellers.
Example #6
Libraries Libraries as well as individuals are eligible for membership.