Burrow in a sentence

The word "burrow" in a example sentences. Learn the definition of burrow and how to use it in a sentence.

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Definition of Burrow

  • An incorporated town. See 1st Borough.
  • A shelter; esp. a hole in the ground made by certain animals, as rabbits, for shelter and habitation.
  • A heap or heaps of rubbish or refuse.
  • A mound. See 3d Barrow, and Camp n., 5.
  • To excavate a hole to lodge in, as in the earth; to lodge in a hole excavated in the earth, as conies or rabbits.
  • To lodge, or take refuge, in any deep or concealed place; to hide.
  • a hole made by an animal, usually for shelter
  • move through by or as by digging

How to use burrow in a sentence. Burrow pronunciation.

When I go, will the long arm reach out for me in the burrows where I shall hide?
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But the timid woodland creature had hopped away, probably to go to its burrow and tell a wonderful story, in rabbit language, about having seen some giants in a big wagon drawn by an elephant-for to a rabbit a goat must seem as large as a circus animal.
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It delights to burrow among the roots of fruit trees, which it gnaws, until often a large tree dies from the under-ground attacks of this troublesome animal.
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For on him, when he was awake at night, he let loose wild beasts; and almost all the hyaenas in that desert, coming out of their burrows, beset him round, and he was in the midst.
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It consists of a twaddling introduction by Mr. Theodore Watts-Dunton, who tells us he has been 'brought into personal relations with many men of genius,' and so on _ad nauseam_, and of a sort of novel by Mr. Burrow, in a palpable imitation of the style of De Foe without a spark of De Foe's ability.
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The only thing for which this Mr. Burrow is distinguished is his crass anti-Catholic bigotry; and the terms in which, in one part of the book at least, he refers to the Blessed Virgin are an outrage not merely on the religious feelings of Catholics, but also on ordinary propriety.
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The Honourable Adam put the paper down, and walked up the street to talk to Mr. Burrows, the postmaster whom, with the aid of Congressman Fairplay, he had had appointed at Edmundton.
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The two racked their brains for three hours; and Postmaster Burrows, who was the fortunate possessor of a pass, offered to go down to Ripton in the interest of his liege lord and see what was up.
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Postmaster Burrows of Edmundton, in rounded periods, is putting in nomination his distinguished neighbour and fellow-citizen, the Honourable Adam B. Hunt, who can subscribe and say amen to every plank in that platform.
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Mr. Burrows indulges in slight but effective sarcasm of sham reformers and so-called business men who perform the arduous task of cutting coupons and live in rarefied regions where they can only be seen by the common people when the light is turned on.
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Putnam, with their glitter-eyed duke, Mr. Bascom, at their head -presumably solid for Adam B. Hunt; Baron Burrows, who farms out the post-office at Edmundton, leads Edmunds County; Earl Elisha Jane, consul at some hot place where he spends the inclement months drops the first ticket for Haines County, ostensibly solid for home-made virtue and the Honourable Giles.
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Mr. Jane, too, is going about the hall, and Postmaster Burrows, and Postmaster Bill Fleeting of Brampton, and the Honourable Nat Billings, and Messrs. Bascom and Botcher, and Mr. Manning, division superintendent, and the Honourable Orrin Young, railroad commissioner and candidate for reappointment-all are embracing the opportunity to greet humble friends or to make new acquaintances.
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It is _because_ Christianity works so secretly, that it works so potently; it is _because_ Christianity burrows and hides itself, that it towers above the clouds; and hence partly it is that its working comes to be misapprehended, or even lost out of sight.
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The mole, far back in the past, had eyes, and gained its livelihood above ground in the broad light of day; but, owing to some change in its surroundings, it was forced to burrow beneath the surface of the earth; consequently its organs of sight have degenerated, and are now practically worthless as far as _vision_ is concerned.
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When approaching a crayfish "town" for the purpose of making observations, I use the utmost caution; otherwise, each inhabitant will retreat into its burrow before I can come close enough to observe them, even with my field-glasses.
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It is only when the desire for perpetuating its race seizes it that it burrows into the skin, thereby producing the intolerable itching which has given to it its very appropriate name.
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The females make tunnels or _cuniculi_ in the cuticle, in which they lay their eggs, and they can readily be removed from these burrows with a needle.
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The Indians were each given a dog tent and two of the tarpaulins were turned over to them, and at some little distance away they soon rigged up something between a hut and a burrow of stones, sods, and brush, about ten feet square, the bottom of which they filled two feet deep with spruce and fir boughs.
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Venters knew then that it had a burrow higher up.
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Oldring had many holes to his burrow.
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Examples of Burrow

Example #1
Kaid looked at him with ill-concealed admiration.
Example #2
Kaid blew a cloud of smoke slowly.
Example #3
Baby William may have thought the package of soda was a white stone, for it was wrapped in a white paper.
Example #4
Here, Trouble, if you want to throw things throw these," and he stopped to pick up some old acorns which he gave his little brother.
Example #5
The mischief done by this creature is very extensive.
Example #6
It is difficult to capture, as it keeps open a means of escape on every side.