Chapter in a sentence

The word "chapter" in a example sentences. Learn the definition of chapter and how to use it in a sentence.

This website focus on english words and example sentences, so everyone can learn how to use them. Easily browse through english vocabulary, listen the sentences or copy them.

Definition of Chapter

  • A division of a book or treatise; as, Genesis has fifty chapters.
  • An assembly of monks, or of the prebends and other clergymen connected with a cathedral, conventual, or collegiate church, or of a diocese, usually presided over by the dean.
  • A community of canons or canonesses.
  • A bishop's council.
  • A business meeting of any religious community.
  • An organized branch of some society or fraternity as of the Freemasons.
  • A meeting of certain organized societies or orders.
  • A chapter house.
  • A decretal epistle.
  • A location or compartment.
  • To divide into chapters, as a book.
  • a subdivision of a written work; usually numbered and titled
  • a series of related events forming an episode
  • a local branch of some fraternity or association
  • an ecclesiastical assembly of the monks in a monastery or even of the canons of a church
  • any distinct period in history or in a person's life

How to use chapter in a sentence. Chapter pronunciation.

CHAPTER VII THE COMPACT One by one the lights went out in the Palace.
play
copy
CHAPTER XII THE JEHAD AND THE LIONS "Allah hu Achbar!
play
copy
I felt rowdyish and "bully," (as the historian Josephus phrases it, in his fine chapter upon the destruction of the Temple).
play
copy
Now whoever has had the luck to ride a real Mexican plug will recognize the animal depicted in this chapter, and hardly consider him exaggerated -but the uninitiated will feel justified in regarding his portrait as a fancy sketch, perhaps.
play
copy
Those "instructions" (we used to read a chapter from them every morning, as intellectual gymnastics, and a couple of chapters in Sunday school every Sabbath, for they treated of all subjects under the sun and had much valuable religious matter in them along with the other statistics) those "instructions" commanded that pen-knives, envelopes, pens and writing-paper be furnished the members of the legislature.
play
copy
CHAPTER XXVII. Hurry, was the word!
play
copy
CHAPTER II 'Runnymede' (so the Mumfords' house was named) stood on its own little plot of ground in one of the tree-shadowed roads which persuade the inhabitants of Sutton that they live in the country.
play
copy
CHAPTER IV Not half an hour after Cobb's departure Louise returned.
play
copy
CHAPTER VI Louise did not appear again that evening.
play
copy
CHAPTER VII Glad of a free evening, Emmeline, after dinner, walked round to Mrs. Fentiman's.
play
copy
Like so many Russian novels, it begins at the beginning, not at the second or third chapter.
play
copy
In the sixth chapter of the latter book, Gogol has himself revealed the sad transformation that had taken place in his own mind, and that made his genius express itself in so different a manner:- "Once, long ago, in the years of my youth, in those beautiful years that rolled so swiftly, I was full of joy, charmed when I arrived for the first time in an unknown place; it might be a farm, a poor little district town, a large village, a small settlement: my eager, childish eyes always found there many interesting objects.
play
copy
The subject expands into a very long novel, and I think it will be amusing, but now I am only at the third chapter. . . .
play
copy
Gogol declared that he did not write a single line of these early chapters without thinking how Pushkin would judge it, at what he would laugh, at what he would applaud.
play
copy
The first part of his work, containing the first eleven chapters, or "songs," was published in May 1842.
play
copy
After one has grasped the plan of the book, the purpose of Chichikov's mission, which one can do in two minutes, one may read the chapters in any haphazard order.
play
copy
Not content with the constant interpolation of side remarks and comments, queries of a politely ironical nature to the reader, in the regular approved fashion of English novels, Gogol added after the tenth chapter a defiant epilogue, in which he explained his reasons for dealing with fact rather than with fancy, of ordinary people rather than with heroes, of commonplace events rather than with melodrama; and then suddenly he tried to jar the reader out of his self-satisfaction, like Balzac in "Pere Goriot.
play
copy
They all used him freely: Tolstoi could hardly have written "The Cossacks" without the inspiration of Gogol, Turgenev must have taken the most beautiful chapter in "Virgin Soil" directly from "Old-fashioned Farmers," and Dostoevski's first book, "Poor Folk," is in many places almost a slavish imitation of "The Cloak"-and he freely acknowledged the debt in the course of his story.
play
copy
Indeed, one does not know for some chapters whether Gemma is sincere or not, and one is angry with Sanin for his moth-like flitting about her radiance.
play
copy
The old monk at the head of the chapter is marvellous; he would find a natural place in one of Ibsen's early historical dramas, for he is a colossal pontifical figure, and has about him the ancient air of authority.
play
copy

Examples of Chapter

Example #1
The excited guests were now knocking at the doors of Cairene notables, bent upon gossip of the night's events, or were scouring the bazaars for ears into which to pour the tale of how David was exalted and Nahoum was brought low; how, before them all, Kaid had commanded Nahoum to appear at the Palace in the morning at eleven, and the Inglesi, as they had named David, at ten.
Example #2
Smiling, Kaid whispered in David's ear.
Example #3
Meanwhile the Nubians in their glittering armour waited without in the blistering square.
Example #4
Bismillah!" murmured Kaid scornfully, then fell to pondering darkly over the evil things he had heard.
Example #5
It seemed to me that nothing could be so fine and so romantic.
Example #6
I had grown well accustomed to wearing a damaged slouch hat, blue woolen shirt, and pants crammed into boot-tops, and gloried in the absence of coat, vest and braces.