Country-town in a sentence

The word "country-town" in a example sentences. Learn the definition of country-town and how to use it in a sentence.

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How to use country-town in a sentence. Country-town pronunciation.

I knew that my wife would in that respect rather rely on me than on the average country-town practitioner.
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The steeped aspect of the woman as a whole showed her to be no native of the country-side or even of a country-town.
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Cumnor is not nearly so large a village, nor a place of such mark, as one anticipates from its romantic and legendary fame; but, being still inaccessible by railway, it has retained more of a sylvan character than we often find in English country-towns.
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Pleasant country to Bedford, where, while they stay, I rode through the town; and a good country-town; and there, drinking, 1s.
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At night to Newport Pagnell; and there a good pleasant country-town, but few people in it.
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Passing this way rather than that-selecting provinces in a country-towns in a province-one quarter in a town-one street in a quarter-one house in a street-having its place of residence and repose, and then continuing its slow, mysterious, fear inspiring march.
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It seems very remarkable to me, and of great honour to the Dutch, that those of them that did go on shore to Gillingham, though they went in fear of their lives, and were some of them killed; and, notwithstanding their provocation at Schelling, yet killed none of our people nor plundered their houses, but did take some things of easy carriage, and left the rest, and not a house burned; and, which is to our eternal disgrace, that what my Lord Douglas's men, who come after them, found there, they plundered and took all away; and the watermen that carried us did further tell us, that our own soldiers are far more terrible to those people of the country-towns than the Dutch themselves.
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The valley, as it spread below our gaze, appeared one huge carpet of heavy-fruited orange-trees, save where at times a rent in the web left visible the bluish blades of wheat, or the intense green of a flax-plantation. Monreale is a mere country-town, containing no object of interest, save the Cathedral.
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In the mean time Mr. Bernard had become very curious about a class of subjects not treated of in any detail in those text-books accessible in most country-towns, to the exclusion of the more special treatises, and especially the rare and ancient works found on the shelves of the larger city-libraries.
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You have come to this country-town without suspicion, and you are moving in the midst of perils.
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There are some _very strange_ things going on here in this place, country-town as it is.
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Not a regular Soprano, but a Country-Town Soprano, of the kind often used for augmenting the Grief in a Funeral.
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Examples of Country-town

Example #1
All the greater was my responsibility.
Example #2
I was enough of a doctor to trust my ability to diagnose.
Example #3
She was an old woman of mottled countenance, attired in a shawl of that nameless tertiary hue which comes, but cannot be made-a hue neither tawny, russet, hazel, nor ash; a sticky black bonnet that seemed to have been worn in the country of the Psalmist where the clouds drop fatness; and an apron that had been white in time so comparatively recent as still to contrast visibly with the rest of her clothes.
Example #4
There was one case only, and the offender stood before him.
Example #5
In this retired neighborhood the road is narrow and bordered with grass, and sometimes interrupted by gates; the hedges grow in unpruned luxuriance; there is not that close-shaven neatness and trimness that characterize the ordinary English landscape.
Example #6
It could not be so old, however, by at least a hundred years, as Giles Gosling's time; nor is there any other object to remind the visitor of the Elizabethan age, unless it be a few ancient cottages, that are perhaps of still earlier date.