Folk in a sentence

The word "folk" in a example sentences. Learn the definition of folk and how to use it in a sentence.

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Definition of Folk

  • People in general, or a separate class of people; -- generally used in the plural form, and often with a qualifying adjective; as, the old folks; poor folks.
  • The persons of one's own family; as, our folks are all well.
  • the traditional and typically anonymous music that is an expression of the life of people in a community
  • people in general (often used in the plural)
  • people descended from a common ancestor
  • a social division of (usually preliterate) people

How to use folk in a sentence. Folk pronunciation.

Kaid addressed his conversation again and again to David, asking questions put to disconcert the consuls and other official folk present, confident in the naive reply which would be returned.
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And I think 'tis better for me, and less hazardous, to get my living by my Tail, then to turn Thief and steal from other Folks.
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But now you talk of that, I'll tell you a good Jest was put last Week upon a Friend of mine, a _Linnen-Draper_, who 'tho he'd so much Holland of his own, wou'd needs be taking up of other Folk's.
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The heroine of "Rudin," of "Smoke," of "On the Eve," the sinister Maria of "Torrents of Spring," the immortal Lisa of "A House of Gentlefolk," the girl in Dostoevski's "Poor Folk;" Dunia and Sonia, in "Crime and Punishment"-many others might be called to mind.
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American undergraduates are the most conservative folk in the world; if any strange theory in morals or politics becomes noised abroad, the American student opposes to it the one time-honoured weapon of the conservative from Aristophanes down,-burlesque.
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His descriptions of the simple folk, the beasts, and the bargainings seem as true as those in "Madame Bovary"-the difference is in the attitude of the author toward his work.
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They all used him freely: Tolstoi could hardly have written "The Cossacks" without the inspiration of Gogol, Turgenev must have taken the most beautiful chapter in "Virgin Soil" directly from "Old-fashioned Farmers," and Dostoevski's first book, "Poor Folk," is in many places almost a slavish imitation of "The Cloak"-and he freely acknowledged the debt in the course of his story.
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Dostoevski's first book, "Poor Folk," appeared when he was only twenty-five years old: it made an instant success, and gave the young author an enviable reputation.
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The story "Poor Folk" is told in the highly artificial form of letters, but is redeemed by its simplicity and deep tenderness.
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Dostoevski seemed fully to realise his debt to Gogol, and in particular to "The Cloak;" for in "Poor Folk," one entire letter is taken up with a description of Makar's emotions after reading that extraordinary tale.
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The novel is a combination of a hospital and an insane asylum; its pages are filled with sickly, diseased, silly, and crazy folk.
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Dostoevski loved children and animals, and so-called simple folk; what is more, he not only loved them, he looked upon them as his greatest teachers.
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Great folks don't know that in even the most difficult affairs a child is able to give advice that is of the utmost importance.
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The sacredness of mad folk is a holy tradition, not yet outworn.
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Angry, sneering, and selfish folk come to regard him with an affection akin to holy awe.
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If one reads "Poor Folk," "Crime and Punishment," "Memoirs of the House of the Dead," "The Idiot," and "The Karamazov Brothers," one will have a complete idea of Dostoevski's genius and of his faults as a writer, and will see clearly his attitude toward life.
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Socialist and revolutionary propaganda are secretly circulated among these stupefied folk, and much of the narrative is taken up with the difficulties of accomplishing this distribution; for the whole book itself is nothing but a revolutionary tract.
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Chekhov's sympathy with Imagination and his hatred for commonplace folk who stupidly try to repress its manifestations are shown again and again in his tales.
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What were you doing all those years at school, if it wasn't learning the difference between real and sham, getting to understand things better than poor folks' children?
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It was in a man's garden; a certain particular place, where the trains slow, and folks have time to read the advertisement and meditate on it.
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Examples of Folk

Example #1
For there was a keen truthfulness in the young man's words which, however suave and carefully balanced, however gravely simple and tactful, left no doubt as to their meaning.
Example #2
Many had heard of David, a few had seen him, and now all eyed with inquisitive interest one who defied so many of the customs of his countrymen; who kept on his hat; who used a Mahommedan salutation like a true believer; whom the Effendina honoured-and presently honoured in an unusual degree by seating him at table opposite himself, where his Chief Chamberlain was used to sit.
Example #3
I that venture my Carcase, nay, that venture my Soul too; and all to get an honest livelihood.
Example #4
The first that stood upon her Pantables, as being chief, was the Whore, and thus it was she manag'd her Cause.
Example #5
I before have told you, Madam; with this addition, which but for him I never shou'd have known).
Example #6
I say it, tolerably handsome then) was very civil to me, and treated me with much respect, giving me a good Dish of Fish for Supper, which with good Store of Wine, serv'd as a fit Provocative for that which follow'd after.