Germany-an in a sentence

The word "germany-an" in a example sentences. Learn the definition of germany-an and how to use it in a sentence.

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How to use germany-an in a sentence. Germany-an pronunciation.

Now, therefore, for the first time in this war, an imperial army appeared in Germany;-an event which if it was menacing to the Protestants, was scarcely more acceptable to the Catholics.
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I remember one most enjoyable trip, when Miss Lowther motored the Hillyards and myself through Germany-an ideal way of "doing" tournaments!
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Do you never think of the hidden shame, the cankering mortification of the consciousness of that nation across the frontier, which had battened on its victory, and was so strong in brute force, that, however brave a face one might put on, there was behind that smiling front always a hidden fear of Germany-an eternal foe, ever gaining in numbers and eternally shaking her mailed fist.
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Examples of Germany-an

Example #1
Wallenstein had orders to unite his army with the troops of the League, and in conjunction with the Bavarian general to attack the King of Denmark.
Example #2
The reputation of the general, the prospect of rapid promotion, and the hope of plunder, attracted to his standard adventurers from all quarters of Germany; and even sovereign princes, stimulated by the desire of glory or of gain, offered to raise regiments for the service of Austria.
Example #3
The place at which a meeting is held, its surroundings, also the facilities it offers for amusement in the evening after your day's tennis is over, add to the enjoyment and make a material difference.
Example #4
Many of us have travelled about together, which is the jolliest way of doing the tournaments.
Example #5
No nation so humiliated ever rose out of her humiliation as France did, but the hidden memory, the daily consciousness of it, set its outward mark on the race.
Example #6
Does it never occur to you what it meant to a great nation, so long a centre of civilization, and a great race, so long a leader in thought, to have found herself without a friend, and to have had to face such a defeat,-a defeat followed by a shocking treaty which kept that disaster forever before her?