Joinville in a sentence

The word "joinville" in a example sentences. Learn the definition of joinville and how to use it in a sentence.

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How to use joinville in a sentence. Joinville pronunciation.

Being somewhat startled at this remark, we resolved to peruse once more the charming pages of Joinville’s History; nor had we to read far before we found that one passage at least had been overlooked, a passage which establishes beyond the possibility of doubt the presence of surgeons and physicians in the camp of the French Crusaders.
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That kind of fame might have been good enough for monks and abbots, but it would never at that time have roused the ambition of a man of Joinville’s stamp.
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His mother, Jeanne of Navarre, the daughter of Joinville’s former liege lord, the last of the Counts of Champagne, who was married to Philip le Bel, the grandson of St. Louis, had asked him “to have a book made for her, containing the sacred words and good actions of our King, St. Looys.
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His confessor, Geoffroy de Beaulieu, relates that the King, before his last illness, wrote down with his own hand some salutary counsels in French, of which he, the confessor, procured a copy before the King’s death, and which he translated from French into Latin. Again, the widow of Louis X. left at her death a collection of forty-one volumes, and the widow of Charles le Bel a collection of twenty volumes; but in neither of them is there any mention of Joinville’s History.
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It is not till we come to the reign of Charles V. (1364-80) that Joinville’s book occurs in the inventory of the royal library, drawn up in 1373 by the King’s valet de chambre, Gilles Mallet.
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But other causes, too, have been assigned by M. Paulin Paris and others for what seems at first sight so very strange,—the entire neglect of Joinville’s work.
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Lastly, when Joinville’s History appeared, the chivalrous King, whose sayings and doings his old brother in arms undertook to describe in his homely and truthful style, had ceased to be an ordinary mortal.
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This text, which could hardly be called Joinville’s, remained for a time the received text.
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Lastly, there is Joinville’s “Credo,” containing his notes on the Apostolic Creed, preserved in a manuscript of the thirteenth century.
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To return to Joinville’s History, the scarcity of MSS.
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After Joinville’s History had once emerged from its obscurity, it soon became the fashion to praise it, and to praise it somewhat indiscriminately.
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Considering how little Joinville’s History was noticed by his contemporaries, how little it was read by the people before it was printed during the reign of François I., it must seem more than doubtful whether Joinville really deserved a place in a series of lectures, “On the Power of the Pen in France.
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Joinville’s book is very pleasant to read, because he gives himself no airs, and tells us as well as he can what he recollects of his excellent King, and of the fearful time which they spent together during the crusade.
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Joinville’s book is readable, and it is readable even in spite of the antiquated and sometimes difficult language in which it is written.
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It is true that there are no direct allusions to these matters in the body of Joinville’s book, yet an impression is left on the reader that he wrote some portion of the Life of St. Louis as a lesson to the young prince to whom it is dedicated.
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Here lies the deep and lasting interest of Joinville’s work.
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To doubt of any points of the Christian doctrine was considered at Joinville’s time, as it is even now, as a temptation of the Devil.
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If we only dwell on certain passages of Joinville’s memoirs, it is easy to say that he and his King, and the whole age in which they moved, were credulous, engrossed by the mere formalities of religion, and fanatical in their enterprise to recover Jerusalem and the Holy Land.
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Joinville does not relate many miracles; and such is his good faith that we may implicitly believe the facts, such as he states them, however we may differ as to the interpretation by which, to Joinville’s mind, these facts assumed a miraculous character.
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Yet nothing could shake Joinville’s faith in the ever-ready help of our Lord, of the Virgin, and of the saints.
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Examples of Joinville

Example #1
On page 78 of M. de Wailly’s spirited translation, in the account of the death of Gautier d’Autrèche, we read that when that brave knight was carried back to his tent nearly dying, “several of the surgeons and physicians of the camp came to see him, and not perceiving that he was dangerously injured, they bled him on both his arms.
Example #2
Nearly the whole French army is annihilated, the King and his companions lie prostrate from wounds and disease, Joinville himself is several times on the point of death; yet nowhere, according to the French reviewer, does the chronicler refer to a medical staff attached to the army or to the person of the King.
Example #3
How the book came to be written he tells us himself in his dedication, dated in the year 1309, and addressed to Louis le Hutin, then only King of Navarre and Count of Champagne, but afterwards King of France.
Example #4
He would have scouted it.
Example #5
That kind of fame might have been good enough for monks and abbots, but it would never at that time have roused the ambition of a man of Joinville’s stamp.