Libel in a sentence

The word "libel" in a example sentences. Learn the definition of libel and how to use it in a sentence.

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Definition of Libel

  • Any defamatory writing; a lampoon; a satire.
  • A malicious publication expressed either in print or in writing, or by pictures, effigies, or other signs, tending to expose another to public hatred, contempt, or ridicule. Such publication is indictable at common law.
  • The crime of issuing a malicious defamatory publication.
  • A written declaration or statement by the plaintiff of his cause of action, and of the relief he seeks.
  • To defame, or expose to public hatred, contempt, or ridicule, by a writing, picture, sign, etc.; to lampoon.
  • To proceed against by filing a libel, particularly against a ship or goods.
  • the written statement of a plaintiff explaining the cause of action (the defamation) and any relief he seeks
  • a false and malicious publication printed for the purpose of defaming a living person
  • print slanderous statements against

How to use libel in a sentence. Libel pronunciation.

Turgenev could not solve his problem; instead of sketching the relations between the 'fathers' and the 'children' he wrote a panegyric to the 'fathers' and a decrial against the 'children'; but he did not even understand the children; instead of a decrial it was nothing but a libel.
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He does us the public service of sweeping away the familiar plea of the Bardolatrous ignoramus, that Shakespear's coarseness was part of the manners of his time, putting his pen with precision on the one name, Spenser, that is necessary to expose such a libel on Elizabethan decency.
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Here is a libel he wrote against me, and presented to the Empress, who graciously has communicated it to me, in answer to my recommendation of him yesterday to the place you ask for him to-day.
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The woman who abuses a waif that Fate has sent into her care would mistreat her own children, and is a living libel on her sex.
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For having well and exactly seen, surveyed, overlooked, reviewed, recognized, read, and read over again, turned and tossed over, seriously perused and examined the bills of complaint, accusations, impeachments, indictments, warnings, citations, summonings, comparitions, appearances, mandates, commissions, delegations, instructions, informations, inquests, preparatories, productions, evidences, proofs, allegations, depositions, cross speeches, contradictions, supplications, requests, petitions, inquiries, instruments of the deposition of witnesses, rejoinders, replies, confirmations of former assertions, duplies, triplies, answers to rejoinders, writings, deeds, reproaches, disabling of exceptions taken, grievances, salvation bills, re-examination of witnesses, confronting of them together, declarations, denunciations, libels, certificates, royal missives, letters of appeal, letters of attorney, instruments of compulsion, delineatories, anticipatories, evocations, messages, dimissions, issues, exceptions, dilatory pleas, demurs, compositions, injunctions, reliefs, reports, returns, confessions, acknowledgments, exploits, executions, and other such-like confects and spiceries, both at the one and the other side, as a good judge ought to do, conform to what hath been noted thereupon.
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To this very day he would have been hiring lawyers to extricate him from libel and false-representation suits.
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He had almost said serving-maids, but the thought of Nancy checked this libel.
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Is that true, or is it just plain libel?
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Also, the fact that she went to sea that time in such a hurry, and forgot to pay for her fuel oil and stores, looks rather suspicious; so, when the vessel comes off dry dock, with about ten thousand dollars' worth of bills against her, you decide to protect your claim for the commission-and, by the Holy Pink-Toed Prophet, Gus, you libel her!
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The news breaks into the papers, and next day every creditor of the ship files a libel on her, also, to protect his claim.
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Naturally the North and South American Steamship Company does not directly or indirectly make any attempt to lift these libels and get the vessel to sea.
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Having got rid of the belief in chance and the disbelief in design, as in no sense appurtenances of Evolution, the third libel upon that doctrine, that it is anti-theistic, might perhaps be left to shift for itself.
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The people for whom it was intended declared they would not have such a libel on their generous friend hung up in their town-hall.
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I shall be considered hysterical and always fainting, which is not true and a perfect libel which they ought to be sent to jail for printing.
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The officer making such seizure and sale shall within ten days after the time of such seizure file a libel in behalf of the State before a trial justice, or a judge of a police or municipal court of the county in which such seizure was made, setting forth the fact of such seizure, appraisal, and sale, the time and place of the seizure, the number of lobsters, cars, traps, barrels, boxes, or other packages so seized and sold, and the amount of the proceeds of such sale; and such trial justice or judge shall appoint a time and place for the hearing of such libel, and shall issue a notice of the same to all persons interested to appear at the time and place appointed, and show cause why the lobsters, cars, traps, barrels, boxes, or other packages so seized and sold, and the proceeds of such sale, should not be declared forfeited, which notice shall be served upon the owner, if known, and by causing an attested copy of such libel and notice to be posted in two public and conspicuous places in the town in which the seizure was made, seven days at least before the time of hearing.
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In spite of protests, he issued a second Declaration of Indulgence in 1688 and ordered it to be read in all Anglican churches, and, when seven bishops remonstrated, he accused them of seditious libel.
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For libel the regent had him imprisoned a year in the Bastille.
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Those who knew Lincoln were well aware he was incapable of so monstrous an act as that of wantonly insulting the dead, as was charged in the infamous libel which asserted that he listened to a comic song on the field of Antietam, before the dead were buried.
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But it is a libel on her beauty,-it is not in the least like her," returned Murray coldly.
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They wept," the organist said, "when they showed the coats and garments that Dorcas made, because they were so badly cut;" but this was a libel, for there were many excellent needlewomen in the society, and among the very best was Miss Euphemia Joliffe.
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Examples of Libel

Example #1
The spreaders of healthy ideas among the young generation he wanted to show up as corrupters of youth, the sowers of discord and evil, haters of good, and in a word, very devils.
Example #2
Even such an empty nothing as Pavel Petrovich, even he is raised on stilts and made a nice man.
Example #3
There was nothing whatever to prevent Shakespear from being as decent as More was before him, or Bunyan after him, and as self-respecting as Raleigh or Sidney, except the tradition of his class, in which education or statesmanship may no doubt be acquired by those who have a turn for them, but in which insolence, derision, profligacy, obscene jesting, debt contracting, and rowdy mischievousness, give continual scandal to the pious, serious, industrious, solvent bourgeois.
Example #4
Mr Harris himself notes Shakespear's contempt for the tradesman and mechanic, and his incorrigible addiction to smutty jokes.
Example #5
In two hours afterwards the nomination was announced to Prince de Z-, who was himself at the head of a cabal against the Minister.
Example #6
Prince de Z- waited on him one day, and, after hesitating some time, began to compliment him on his liberal sentiments, and concluded by asking the place of a governor for his cousin, with whom he had reason to suppose the Count much offended.