Like in a sentence

The word "like" in a example sentences. Learn the definition of like and how to use it in a sentence.

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Definition of Like

  • Having the same, or nearly the same, appearance, qualities, or characteristics; resembling; similar to; similar; alike; -- often with in and the particulars of the resemblance; as, they are like each other in features, complexion, and many traits of character.
  • Equal, or nearly equal; as, fields of like extent.
  • Having probability; affording probability; probable; likely.
  • Inclined toward; disposed to; as, to feel like taking a walk.
  • That which is equal or similar to another; the counterpart; an exact resemblance; a copy.
  • A liking; a preference; inclination; -- usually in pl.; as, we all have likes and dislikes.
  • The stroke which equalizes the number of strokes played by the opposing player or side; as, to play the like.
  • In a manner like that of; in a manner similar to; as, do not act like him.
  • In a like or similar manner.
  • Likely; probably.
  • To be pleased with in a moderate degree; to approve; to take satisfaction in; to enjoy.
  • To be pleased; to choose.
  • To come near; to avoid with difficulty; to escape narrowly; as, he liked to have been too late. Cf. Had like, under Like a.
  • a kind of person
  • a similar kind
  • feel about or towards; consider, evaluate, or regard
  • be fond of
  • find enjoyable or agreeable
  • prefer or wish to do something
  • want to have
  • resembling or similar; having the same or some of the same characteristics; often used in combination
  • having the same or similar characteristics
  • equal in amount or value

How to use like in a sentence. Like pronunciation.

He has scientific tricks like his father before him.
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In degree it has ever been so; but now it is like a constant frown upon his forehead.
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Kaid ground out their lives like corn between the millstones.
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Perhaps because David wore his hat always and the long coat with high collar like a Turk, or because Prince Kaid was an acute judge of human nature, and also because honesty was a thing he greatly desired-in others-and never found near his own person; however it was, he had set David high in his esteem at once.
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A foreigner of this character they had never before seen, with coat buttoned up like an Egyptian official in the presence of his superior, and this wide, droll hat on his head.
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Many had heard of David, a few had seen him, and now all eyed with inquisitive interest one who defied so many of the customs of his countrymen; who kept on his hat; who used a Mahommedan salutation like a true believer; whom the Effendina honoured-and presently honoured in an unusual degree by seating him at table opposite himself, where his Chief Chamberlain was used to sit.
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There were no Grand Viziers in Egypt; but he was as much like one as possible, and he had one uncommon virtue, he was greatly generous.
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It was to him, however, like a ground-wire in telegraphy- it carried off the nervous force tingling in him and driving him to impulsive action, while his reputation called for a constant outward urbanity, a philosophical apathy.
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His pulses, which, but a few minutes past, were throbbing and pounding like drums in his ears, seemed now to flow and beat in very quiet.
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His presence alone would have been enough to save the girl from further molestation; but, he had thrown himself upon the man like a tiger.
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There flashed before his mind the scene of death in which his own father had lain, butchered like a beast in the shambles, a victim to the rage of Ibrahim Pasha, the son of Mehemet Ali.
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For the first time in his life he had a shrinking from the light, and from the sun which he had loved like a Persian, had, in a sense, unconsciously worshipped.
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Mocking shapes flitted past him, the wings of obscene birds buffeted him, the morass grew up about him; and now it was all a red moving mass like a dead sea heaving about him.
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A secret like that of David and Hylda will do in a day what a score of years could not accomplish, will insinuate confidences which might never be given to the nearest or dearest.
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She always spoke like that.
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I may sit in the court-yard and hear the singers, may listen to the tale-tellers by the light of the moon; I may hear the tales of Al-Raschid chanted by one whose tongue never falters, and whose voice is like music; after the manner of the East I may give bread and meat to the poor at sunset; I may call the dancers to the feast.
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Saadat, I would labour, but my master has taken away from me the anvil, the fire, and the hammer, and I sit without the door like an armless beggar.
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His eyes were like a child's, wide and confiding.
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It doesn't give you the jim-jumps like Mexico.
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He was on the threshold of his career: action had not yet begun; he was standing like a swimmer on a high shore, looking into depths beneath which have never been plumbed by mortal man, wondering what currents, what rocks, lay beneath the surface of the blue.
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Examples of Like

Example #1
Now is it astronomy, and now chemistry, and suchlike; and always it is the Eglington mind, which let God A'mighty make it as a favour.
Example #2
He came to snatch old Soolsby's palace, his nest on the hill, to use it for a telescope, or such whimsies.
Example #3
I see him at his window looking out towards the Cloistered House; and if our neighbour comes forth, perhaps upon his hunter, or now in his cart, or again with his dogs, he draws his hat down upon his eyes and whispers to himself.
Example #4
One thing I do observe, his heart is hard set against Lord Eglington.
Example #5
David had been long enough in Egypt to know what sort of toiling it was.
Example #6
The cities of the dead Khalifas and Mamelukes separated them from the living city where the fellah toiled, and Arab, Bedouin, Copt strove together to intercept the fruits of his toiling, as it passed in the form of taxes to the Palace of the Prince Pasha; while in the dark corners crouched, waiting, the cormorant usurers-Greeks, Armenians, and Syrians, a hideous salvage corps, who saved the house of a man that they might at last walk off with his shirt and the cloth under which he was carried to his grave.