Oxford in a sentence

The word "oxford" in a example sentences. Learn the definition of oxford and how to use it in a sentence.

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Definition of Oxford

  • Of or pertaining to the city or university of Oxford, England.
  • a low shoe laced over the instep
  • a university in England
  • a city in southern England to the northwest of London; site of Oxford University
  • a university town in northern Mississippi; home of William Faulkner

How to use oxford in a sentence. Oxford pronunciation.

Foreign Subscriptions Our agent for British subscriptions is B. H. Blackwell, Broad Street, Oxford, ENGLAND.
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Mr. Tarrant had been at Oxford; his speech was marked with the University accent; he talked little, and seemed to prefer his own society.
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A man I knew at Oxford has gone out there, and is likely to stay.
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They were safe at length, in the right part of Oxford Street, and moving with the stream.
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Sutherland and he lay about in delicious sunshine, under a marvellous sky, smoking excellent cigars, and talking over old Oxford days.
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I passed him in Oxford Street the other day, and he either didn't see me, or didn't want to.
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The later suggestion of Mr Acheson that the Dark Lady, far from being a maid of honor, kept a tavern in Oxford and was the mother of Davenant the poet, is the one I should have adopted had I wished to be up to date.
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My intention being to go this morning to White Hall to hear South, my Lord Chancellor's chaplain, the famous preacher and oratour of Oxford, (who the last Lord's day did sink down in the pulpit before the King, and could not proceed,) it did rain, and the wind against me, that I could by no means get a boat or coach to carry me; and so I staid at Paul's, where the judges did all meet, and heard a sermon, it being the first Sunday of the term; but they had a very poor sermon.
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The Wesleys were sons of Samuel Wesley, a clergyman of the Church of England, and while at the University of Oxford they, with two companions, had formed a little society for religious improvement, and by their strict and methodical habits gained the name of "Methodists"; both brothers had taken orders in the English Church, and were on their way to Georgia, John to serve as rector at Savannah, and Charles as Gen. Oglethorpe's private secretary.
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Benjamin Ingham was born in Yorkshire, and met the Wesleys at Oxford, where he joined their Methodist society.
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Mr. Benjamin Ingham, of Queen's College, Oxford, Mr. Charles Delamotte, son of a merchant in London, who had offered himself some days before, my brother Charles Wesley, and myself, took boat for Gravesend, in order to embark for Georgia.
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Ten days after Boehler reached London he accepted an invitation from the two Wesleys, and went with them to Oxford.
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Fresh from the University halls of Jena, he had met the students of Oxford on equal footing, quickly winning their respect and admiration, but these soldiers and sailors, restless, eager for excitement, rude and unlettered, were a new thing to him, a book written in a language to which he had no key.
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He had been at Oxford during the movement which ended in the secession from the Established Church of Edward Manning, and he felt a certain sympathy for the Church of Rome.
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The masters, graduates of Oxford or Cambridge, were ordained and unmarried; if by chance they wished to marry they could only do so by accepting one of the smaller livings at the disposal of the Chapter; but for many years none of them had cared to leave the refined society of Tercanbury, which owing to the cavalry depot had a martial as well as an ecclesiastical tone, for the monotony of life in a country rectory; and they were now all men of middle age.
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Dr. Fleming had gone to the linendraper his father-they all remembered the shop, Perkins and Cooper, in St. Catherine's Street-and said he hoped Tom would remain with them till he went to Oxford.
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He did not seem to care now that Philip's work was poor, that he ran small chance against keen rivals of carrying off the scholarship necessary for him to go to Oxford: the important matter was his changed intention about his life afterwards.
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And besides, I don't know that I particularly want to go to Oxford.
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But the Vicar of Blackstable did not easily alter any arrangements he had made, and it had always been intended that Philip should stay at King's School till he was eighteen, and should then go to Oxford.
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He would not say that he felt Oxford would be little better than a continuation of his life at school.
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Examples of Oxford

Example #1
Because the publications are issued without profit it will be impossible to allow discounts to libraries, agents, or booksellers.
Example #2
Libraries Libraries as well as individuals are eligible for membership.
Example #3
In conversation with Nancy, though scrupulously courteous and perfectly good-natured, he never forgot that she was the friend of his cousins' governess, that their intercourse must be viewed as an irregular sort of thing, and that it behoved him to support his dignity whilst condescending to a social inferior.
Example #4
So, at all events, it struck Miss. Lord, very sensitive in such matters.
Example #5
Partly because it is a delightful winter climate; partly because I have a friend there; partly because the islands are interesting.
Example #6
His father owns nearly the whole of an island; and as he's in very bad health, my friend may soon come into possession.