Pengelly in a sentence

The word "pengelly" in a example sentences. Learn the definition of pengelly and how to use it in a sentence.

This website focus on english words and example sentences, so everyone can learn how to use them. Easily browse through english vocabulary, listen the sentences or copy them.

How to use pengelly in a sentence. Pengelly pronunciation.

A thorough examination of the caverns of Brixham and Torquay, by Pengelly and others, made it still more evident that man had existed in the early Quaternary period.
play
copy
The careful investigations carried on by Dr. Falconer, Mr. Pengelly, and others, in the Brixham cave near Torquay, in 1858, demonstrated that flint knives were there imbedded in such a manner in loam underlying a floor of stalagmite as to prove that man had been an inhabitant of that region when the cave-bear and other members of the ancient post-pliocene fauna were also in existence.
play
copy
Mr. Pengelly has confirmed Sir H. De la Beche's opinion that much of the upper portion of this old lacustrine formation has been removed by denudation.
play
copy
Pengelly, Mr., on Bovey Tracey lignite.
play
copy
St. Michael’s Mount in Cornwall is so well known to most people, either from sight or from report, that a description of its peculiar features may be deemed almost superfluous; but in order to start fair, I shall quote a short account from the pen of an eminent geologist, Mr. Pengelly, to whom I shall have to refer frequently in the course of this paper.
play
copy
Mr. Pengelly proceeded to show that the geological change which converted the promontory into an island may be due to two causes.
play
copy
Secondly, this change may have taken place by a general subsidence of the land, and this is the opinion adopted by Mr. Pengelly.
play
copy
No exact date was assigned to this subsidence, but Mr. Pengelly finished by expressing his decided opinion that, subsequent to a period when Cornwall was inhabited by a race speaking a Celtic language, St. Michael’s Mount was “a hoar rock in the wood,” and has since become insulated by powerful geological changes.
play
copy
In a more recent paper read at the Royal Institution (April 5, 1867), Mr. Pengelly has somewhat modified his opinion.
play
copy
If, however, the severance of the Mount from the mainland was the result, not of retrocession, but of the subsidence of the country,—a rival theory which Mr. Pengelly still admits as possible,—the former calculation would fail, and the only means of fixing the date of this severance would be supplied by the remains found in the forests that were carried down by that subsidence, and which are supposed to belong to the mammoth era.
play
copy
In his paper read before the British Association at Manchester, Mr. Pengelly adduced that very name as irrefragable evidence that Cornish, _i.e._ a Celtic language, an Aryan language, was spoken in the extreme west of Europe about 20,000 years ago.
play
copy
In his more recent paper Mr. Pengelly has given up this position, and he considers it improbable that any philologer could now give a trustworthy translation of a language spoken 20,000 years ago.
play
copy
But my object was only to point out the uncertainty of the evidence which Mr. Pengelly has adduced in support of a theory which would completely revolutionize our received views as to the early history of language and the migrations of the Aryan race.
play
copy
At first sight the argument used by Mr. Pengelly seems unanswerable.
play
copy

Examples of Pengelly

Example #1
As to the controversy generally, see Mastrofini; also La Replique des douze Docteurs, cited by Guillaumin and Coquelin; also Reusch, vol.
Example #2
The existence of a period before the Glacial epoch or between different glacial epochs in England, when the Englishman was a savage, using rude stone tools, was then fully ascertained, and, what was more significant, there were clearly shown a gradation and evolution even in the history of that period.
Example #3
The absence of gnawed bones had led Dr. Schmerling to infer that none of the Belgian caves which he explored had served as the dens of wild beasts; but there are many caves in Germany and England which have certainly been so inhabited, especially by the extinct hyaena and bear.
Example #4
The skulls from these Belgian caverns display no marked deviation from the normal European type of the present day.
Example #5
The lignite is of bad quality for economical purposes, as there is a great admixture in it of iron pyrites, and it emits a sulphurous odour, but it has been successfully applied to the baking of pottery, for which some of the fine clays are well adapted.
Example #6
The strata extend over a plain nine miles long, and they consist of the materials of decomposed and worn-down granite and vegetable matter, and have evidently filled up an ancient hollow or lake-like expansion of the valleys of the Bovey and Teign.