Press in a sentence

The word "press" in a example sentences. Learn the definition of press and how to use it in a sentence.

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Definition of Press

  • An East Indian insectivore (Tupaia ferruginea). It is arboreal in its habits, and has a bushy tail. The fur is soft, and varies from rusty red to maroon and to brownish black.
  • To force into service, particularly into naval service; to impress.
  • A commission to force men into public service, particularly into the navy.
  • To urge, or act upon, with force, as weight; to act upon by pushing or thrusting, in distinction from pulling; to crowd or compel by a gradual and continued exertion; to bear upon; to squeeze; to compress; as, we press the ground with the feet when we walk; we press the couch on which we repose; we press substances with the hands, fingers, or arms; we are pressed in a crowd.
  • To squeeze, in order to extract the juice or contents of; to squeeze out, or express, from something.
  • To squeeze in or with suitable instruments or apparatus, in order to compact, make dense, or smooth; as, to press cotton bales, paper, etc.; to smooth by ironing; as, to press clothes.
  • To embrace closely; to hug.
  • To oppress; to bear hard upon.
  • To straiten; to distress; as, to be pressed with want or hunger.
  • To exercise very powerful or irresistible influence upon or over; to constrain; to force; to compel.
  • To try to force (something upon some one); to urge or inculcate with earnestness or importunity; to enforce; as, to press divine truth on an audience.
  • To drive with violence; to hurry; to urge on; to ply hard; as, to press a horse in a race.
  • To exert pressure; to bear heavily; to push, crowd, or urge with steady force.
  • To move on with urging and crowding; to make one's way with violence or effort; to bear onward forcibly; to crowd; to throng; to encroach.
  • To urge with vehemence or importunity; to exert a strong or compelling influence; as, an argument presses upon the judgment.
  • An apparatus or machine by which any substance or body is pressed, squeezed, stamped, or shaped, or by which an impression of a body is taken; sometimes, the place or building containing a press or presses.
  • Specifically, a printing press.
  • The art or business of printing and publishing; hence, printed publications, taken collectively, more especially newspapers or the persons employed in writing for them; as, a free press is a blessing, a licentious press is a curse.
  • An upright case or closet for the safe keeping of articles; as, a clothes press.
  • The act of pressing or thronging forward.
  • Urgent demands of business or affairs; urgency; as, a press of engagements.
  • A multitude of individuals crowded together; � crowd of single things; a throng.
  • the act of pressing; the exertion of pressure
  • a weightlift in which the barbell is lifted to shoulder height and then smoothly lifted overhead
  • any machine that exerts pressure to form or shape or cut materials or extract liquids or compress solids
  • a machine used for printing
  • clamp to prevent wooden rackets from warping when not in use
  • a tall piece of furniture that provides storage space for clothes; has a door and rails or hooks for hanging clothes
  • the print media responsible for gathering and publishing news in the form of newspapers or magazines
  • a dense crowd of people
  • the state of demanding notice or attention
  • ask for or request earnestly
  • force or impel in an indicated direction
  • lift weights
  • squeeze or press together
  • place between two surfaces and apply weight or pressure
  • press and smooth with a heated iron
  • exert pressure or force to or upon
  • make strenuous pushing movements during birth to expel the baby
  • press from a plastic
  • create by pressing
  • crowd closely
  • exert oneself continuously, vigorously, or obtrusively to gain an end or engage in a crusade for a certain cause or person; be an advocate for
  • to be oppressive or burdensome
  • be urgent

How to use press in a sentence. Press pronunciation.

Those persons with carriages could not use them, as the press was so great that it was almost impossible to move.
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Puck and Punch, and the press universal, would fall upon it and make merciless fun of it, and its first exhibition would be also its last. Against the crimes of the French Revolution and of Bonaparte may be set two compensating benefactions: the Revolution broke the chains of the ANCIEN REGIME and of the Church, and made of a nation of abject slaves a nation of freemen; and Bonaparte instituted the setting of merit above birth, and also so completely stripped the divinity from royalty, that whereas crowned heads in Europe were gods before, they are only men, since, and can never be gods again, but only figureheads, and answerable for their acts like common clay.
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And with special reference to one particular-the Press.
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All she had now to do was to press onward with the people around her; save by chance, she could not possibly be discovered.
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I approve the Revolution, liberty, equality, the press, railways, and the telegraph; and as I often say to Monsieur le Cure, every cause that would live must accommodate itself cheerfully to the progress of its epoch, and study how to serve itself by it.
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It would be painful to dwell on the joy which Madame de Tecle felt; and her only surprise was that Camors had not come in person to press his suit.
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May I press your hand in friendship?'-' Mon Dieu!
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He wished to see his son-to speak to him-to embrace him, and to press him to his heart.
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I did not wish to press him to-day, but he allows me to return tomorrow.
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The excise-officer, with great civility, answered that no doubt at first sight it might appear rather strange, but that it was the only article left untaxed in Vraibleusia; that there was a slight deficiency in the last quarter's revenue, and that therefore the Government had no alternative; that it was a tax which did not press heavily upon the individual, because the Vraibleusians were of a sedentary habit; that, besides, it was an opinion every day more received among the best judges that the more a man was taxed the richer he ultimately would prove; and he concluded by saying that Popanilla need not make himself uneasy about these demands, because, if he were ruined to-morrow, being a foreigner, he was entitled by the law of the land to five thousand a-year; whereas he, the excise-man, being a native-born Vraibleusian, had no claims whatever upon the Government; therefore he hoped his honour would give him something to drink.
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Popanilla was so pleased with his mode of life, and had acquired such a taste for poetry, pin-apples, and pepper since he had ceased to be an active member of society, that he applied to have his trial postponed, on the ground of the prejudice which had been excited against him by the public press.
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In the meantime, while waiting for the equipment to dry out, George and his friend, Billy Gordon, who owned the launch, took Harriet and Jane to town, where Jane wished to go to renew some of their supplies, as well as to purchase a couple of flatirons with which to press their wet clothing that had hung in the cabin when the deluge came.
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He will print them, out of doubt; for he cares not what he puts into the press when he would put us two.
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I make bold to press with so little preparation upon you.
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If there be any pody in the house, and in the chambers, and in the coffers, and in the presses, heaven forgive my sins at the day of judgment!
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Neither press, coffer, chest, trunk, well, vault, but he hath an abstract for the remembrance of such places, and goes to them by his note.
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It was impossible to say now why he had wished to press her secret from her.
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Within the next few weeks, for certain, the last chapter of Mr. Poole's book will be passed for press, and then we shall go abroad and shall visit all the great men in Europe.
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Spangenberg coming in most opportunely, the Moravian affairs were fully discussed, and the new-comers learned that their arrival had been fortunately timed, for the Georgia Trustees were to hold one of their semi-annual meetings two days later, when Oglethorpe could press their matter, and a ship was to sail for Georgia the latter part of the month.
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Weapons were offered to all the members of the party, but declined, as they wished to give no excuse to any one who might try to press them into military service.
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Examples of Press

Example #1
Several ladies got lost, and returned to Paris on foot; others lost their shoes, and it was a pitiable sight to see the pretty feet in the mud.
Example #2
When it was time to return to Paris the carriages were missing, as the coachmen, thinking that the fete would last till daylight, had prudently thought that they would not take the trouble to wait all night.
Example #3
Against the crimes of the French Revolution and of Bonaparte may be set two compensating benefactions: the Revolution broke the chains of the ANCIEN REGIME and of the Church, and made of a nation of abject slaves a nation of freemen; and Bonaparte instituted the setting of merit above birth, and also so completely stripped the divinity from royalty, that whereas crowned heads in Europe were gods before, they are only men, since, and can never be gods again, but only figureheads, and answerable for their acts like common clay.
Example #4
The very feature that keeps it alive in the South-girly-girly romance-would kill it in the North or in London.
Example #5
Only think now, of the difference between our newspapers, all our periodicals of to-day, and those fifty years ago.
Example #6
Did you ever really consider, Miss. Morgan, what a marvellous thing one of our great newspapers really is?