Recourse in a sentence

The word "recourse" in a example sentences. Learn the definition of recourse and how to use it in a sentence.

This website focus on english words and example sentences, so everyone can learn how to use them. Easily browse through english vocabulary, listen the sentences or copy them.

Definition of Recourse

  • Recurrence in difficulty, perplexity, need, or the like; access or application for aid; resort.
  • act of turning to for assistance
  • something or someone turned to for assistance or security

How to use recourse in a sentence. Recourse pronunciation.

He had no recourse, as has been said, to either threats or menaces, for it was to his wife's reason that he appealed; and her consent was entirely voluntary.
play
copy
After this futile endeavour, he had recourse to the bottles in his cupboard, and presently fell into a troubled sleep.
play
copy
An interview with her husband's married sister proved so unsatisfactory to Ada, that she had recourse to her familiar weapons, rage, insult, and menace; with the result that she was forcibly removed, and made a scandal in the quiet street.
play
copy
The necessity of passing long evenings made him haunt places of entertainment, and he sometimes had recourse to drink,-he by nature the soberest of men,-in fear of what awaited him on his tardy appearance at Brixton.
play
copy
Well, I regret this, and must have recourse to other projects to aid you.
play
copy
The Marquise had recourse to Daniel, of whom she made a confidant, and having questioned him, drew out the acknowledgment that for some time his master had been in the habit of going out in the evening and not returning until morning.
play
copy
In the natural course of things they had recourse to remonstrances, but their appeals were equally fruitless.
play
copy
Oyster-shells were first introduced; muscle-shells speedily followed; and, as commerce became more complicate, they had even been obliged to have recourse to snail-shells.
play
copy
Butlers were at a premium; coach-makers never slept; card-engravers, having exhausted copper, had recourse to steel; and the demand for arms at the Heralds' College was so great that even the mystical genius of Garter was exhausted, and hostile meetings were commenced between the junior members of some ancient families, to whom the same crest had been unwittingly apportioned; but, the seconds interfering, they discovered themselves to be relations.
play
copy
The effects of bad fruit, however, upon the constitution, and consequently upon the national character, are so injurious that every liberal man must regret that any people, either from ignorance or obligation, should be forced to have recourse to anything so fatal, and must feel that it is the duty of everyone who professes to be a philanthropist to propagate and encourage a taste for good fruit throughout all countries of the globe.
play
copy
Although they profess to adopt these stimulants from the great admiration which they entertain for a high flavour, there are, nevertheless, some less ardent people who suspect that they rather have recourse to them from the weakness of their digestion.
play
copy
Another showed that it was altogether clearly ascribable to the pernicious custom of issuing pink shells; but if, instead of this mode of representing wealth, they had had recourse to blue shells, the nation would now have advanced to a state of prosperity which it had never yet reached.
play
copy
To maintain themselves in this false position, they necessarily have recourse to much destructive conduct and to many fictitious principles.
play
copy
None, I protest; but I'll give you a pottle of burnt sack to give me recourse to him, and tell him my name is Brook-only for a jest. HOST.
play
copy
As easy and familiar recourse to wine prevents resort to stronger drinks, so it seems highly probable that the practice of temperate drinking would in thousands of cases obviate the craving for drugs.
play
copy
Men of understanding do yet, to this day, condemn the custom of the kings of Persia to give their lieutenants and agents so little rein, that, upon the least arising difficulties, they must fain have recourse to their further commands; this delay, in so vast an extent of dominion, having often very much prejudiced their affairs; and Crassus, writing to a man whose profession it was best to understand those things, and pre-acquainting him to what use this mast was designed, did he not seem to consult his advice, and in a manner invite him to interpose his better judgment?
play
copy
Mrs. Hilbery was not much interested in these remarks, which seemed to have a melancholy tendency, and to revive her spirits she had recourse to an infallible remedy-she looked out of the window.
play
copy
But, while she hesitated and sought for words not too direct, her mother had recourse to Shakespeare, and turned page after page, set upon finding some quotation which said all this about love far, far better than she could.
play
copy
In order to answer her Mr. Hilbery had to have recourse to the exact scholarship of William Rodney, and before he had given his excellent authorities for believing as he believed, Rodney felt himself admitted once more to the society of the civilized and sanctioned by the authority of no less a person than Shakespeare himself.
play
copy
I have since ascertained that the antique images of Thebias have the same characteristic; and Mr. Bruce has offered a multitude of analogous facts; but this traveller, of whom I heard some mention at Cairo, has so interwoven these facts with certain systematic opinions, that we should have recourse to his narratives with caution.
play
copy

Examples of Recourse

Example #1
I repeat that there was no violence on the part of the Emperor; but there was courage, resignation, and submission on that of the Empress.
Example #2
But it was by most gentle means, and with every mark of tender consideration, that he strove to bring the Empress to this painful sacrifice.
Example #3
At the end of the second week, early one evening, three persons came to him by appointment: his partner Samuel Barmby, Mr. Barmby, senior, and a well-dressed gentleman whom Mary-she opened the door to them-had never seen before.
Example #4
In the morning he occasionally prepared himself as if to start for his place of business; he left the house, and walked for perhaps a couple of hundred yards, then slackened his pace, stopped, looked about him in an agony of indecision, and at length returned.
Example #5
Then she consulted men of law, and found one who encouraged her to sue for restitution of conjugal rights.
Example #6
She remembered that Peachey had relatives at Canterbury, and after a troublesome search succeeded in her purpose.