Seville in a sentence

The word "seville" in a example sentences. Learn the definition of seville and how to use it in a sentence.

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Definition of Seville

  • a city in southwestern Spain; a major port and cultural center; the capital of bullfighting in Spain

How to use seville in a sentence. Seville pronunciation.

His nationality made Philip regard him as a representative of romance, and he asked him about Seville and Granada, Velasquez and Calderon.
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Seville: it brings to the mind girls dancing with castanets, singing in gardens by the Guadalquivir, bull-fights, orange-blossom, mantillas, mantones de Manila.
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Theophile Gautier got out of Seville all that it has to offer.
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Cordova, Seville, Toledo, Leon, Tarragona, Burgos.
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Upon his head was a hat with a high peak, somewhat of the kind which the Spaniards call _calane_, so much in favour with the bravos of Seville and Madrid.
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Not a man in Seville, not a man in Spain, but would send you gifts if he dared.
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He had come back to Seville from a walk in the country when a man emerging from an archway looked in his face and started back, "exclaiming in the purest and most melodious French: 'What do I see?
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Speaking to Colonel Napier in 1839 at Seville, he said that he had picked up the Gypsy tongue "some years ago in Moultan," and he gave the impression that he had visited most parts of the East.
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If he went, he may have paid the visits to Paris, Bayonne, Italy and Spain, which he alludes to in "The Bible in Spain"; he may, as Dr. Knapp suggests, have covered the ground of Murtagh's alleged travels in "The Romany Rye," and have been at Pau, with Quesada's army marching to Pamplona, at Torrelodones, and at Seville.
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The books had at last to be sent out of the country, British Consuls were forbidden to countenance religious agents; and in the opinion of the Consul at Seville, J. M. Brackenbury, this was directly due to Graydon's indiscretions.
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Thereupon he went to Seville.
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At Seville it was, in May, 1839, that Colonel Napier met him.
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From Seville Borrow took a journey of a few weeks to Tangier and Barbary.
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He had the advantage of a singular address, being for the moment in the prison of Seville, where he had been illegally thrown, after a quarrel with the Alcalde over the matter of a passport.
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He was able to send them a very high testimony to his discretion from the English Consul at Seville, and he himself reminded them that he had been "fighting with wild beasts" during this last visit.
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The Society several times repeated his recall, but he did not return, apparently because he wished to remain with Mrs. Clarke in Seville, and because he no longer felt himself at their beck and call.
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The picture of the Gitana of Seville hands on some of its own power to the quieter pages, and at length, with a score of other achievements of the same solid kind, kindles well-nigh every part of the shapeless book.
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Observe, for example, the Gitana, even her of Seville.
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It is a fairy scene such as nowhere meets the eye but at Seville, or perhaps at Fez and Shiraz, in the palaces of the Sultan and the Shah.
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The Gypsy pulls the bell, when is heard the soft cry of 'Quien es'; the door, unlocked by means of a string, recedes upon its hinges, when in walks the Gitana, the witch-wife of Multan, with a look such as the tiger-cat casts when she stealeth from her jungle into the plain. "Yes, well may you exclaim, 'Ave Maria purissima,' ye dames and maidens of Seville, as she advances towards you; she is not of yourselves, she is not of your blood, she or her fathers have walked to your clime from a distance of three thousand leagues.
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Examples of Seville

Example #1
But Miguel bad no patience with the grandeur of his country.
Example #2
Miguel sat regularly, and though he refused to accept payment he borrowed fifty francs from Philip every now and then: it was a little more expensive than if Philip had paid for the sittings in the usual way; but gave the Spaniard a satisfactory feeling that he was not earning his living in a degrading manner.
Example #3
It is the Spain of comic opera and Montmartre.
Example #4
Its facile charm can offer permanent entertainment only to an intelligence which is superficial.
Example #5
We who come after him can only repeat his sensations.