Steamship in a sentence

The word "steamship" in a example sentences. Learn the definition of steamship and how to use it in a sentence.

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Definition of Steamship

  • A ship or seagoing vessel propelled by the power of steam; a steamer.
  • a ship powered by one or more steam engines

How to use steamship in a sentence. Steamship pronunciation.

It was my happiness to cross the Atlantic in the company of this dear brother on the steamship Sardinian, from Quebec to Liverpool, in June, 1880.
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A remarkable illustration of God's mysterious way is found in connection with the rescue of some of the passengers of the ill-fated French steamship, Ville du Havre, which was sunk by a collision with the Loch Earn, November 22, 1873, on her voyage from New York to France.
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To-day a mighty steamship equipped with powerful engines, plows its way across the billows with little regard for wind and weather, bearing thousands of passengers, many of whom are given all the luxury that space permits, a table that equals any provided by the best hotels ashore, and attendance that is unsurpassed.
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Toiling resolutely to rise, step by step, in the service of the Peninsular and Oriental Steamship Company, he had never dreamed of the sudden favor of his rich kinsman, and yet, loyal as the good Sir James Douglas, he silently took up his quest.
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Even then the telegraph was clicking away a message to Johnstone's lawyer and bankers in Calcutta, and to his young relative, Douglas Fraser, of the great P. and O. steamship service.
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WHEN she married-which was not to be thought of for an indefinite number of years to come-she would of course marry a-well, not a President of the United States, perhaps-but an admiral possibly, or a millionaire, or the owner of a fleet of steamships, or something like that.
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This was forcibly impressed upon me a short time ago, while in the company of the late Charles Haswell, then the oldest member of this Society, who, seeing one of the recently built men-of-war coming up the harbor, remarked that he had designed the first steamship for the United States Navy.
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By some refraction which new lenses or else steamships shall operate, shall I not yet one day see again the disk of benign Phosphorus?
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In four days they were in San Francisco, and two days later on board a fast steamship bound for the land of the Mikado.
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The scene was the outside cabin deck of the well-appointed steamer "Queen" of the Alaska Steamship Company, which was plowing her way through the quiet waters of the "Inside Passage," on her way to the land of the Yukon and the Klondike.
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It was something about the Panama Canal, and a coaling station of a steamship and fruit concern on the shore of one of the Latin American countries.
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He likewise noted a hat-box and a great, shapeless English bag, both plastered crazily with hotel and steamship labels hailing from every quarter of the world.
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He knows that, if our ancestors had committed that kind of error regarding lines and surfaces and solids, there would to-day be no science of geometry; and he knows that, if there were no geometry, there would be no architecture in the world, no surveying, no railroads, no astronomy, no charting of the seas, no steamships, no engineering, nothing whatever of the now familiar world-wide affairs made possible by the scientific conquest of space.
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These persons Harley booked for the steamship New York, sailing from New York City for Southampton on the third day of July, 1895.
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She was a stickler for form; and when she was summoned to go on board of an ocean steamship there to take part in a romance for the mere aggrandizement of a young author, she intended that he should not ignore the proprieties, even if in a sense the proprieties to which she referred did antedate the period at which his story was to open.
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This berth he continued to occupy with pleasure and profit to all concerned, until a small financial tidal wave, which began with Matt Peasley's purchase, at a ridiculously low figure, of the Oriental Steamship Company's huge freighter, _Narcissus_, swept the cunning Matthew into the presidency of the Blue Star Navigation Company; whereupon Matt designed to take Murphy out of the _Retriever_ and have him try his hand in steam as master of the _Narcissus_.
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She's a hog on coal, and the Oriental steamship people used to nag him about the fuel bills.
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I suppose that while we have steamships the skippers will always wonder how the vessel can possibly make steerage way, considering the chief engineers, while the chiefs will never cease marvelling that such fine ships should be entrusted to a lot of Johnny Know-Nothings.
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For the sake of argument we'll assume it's soft coal, because anthracite has not as yet become popular as steamship fuel.
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As for sudden death by violence at the hands of any member of the crew of this steamship, I should be willing to risk quite a sum of money that no such tragedy will be enacted.
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Examples of Steamship

Example #1
I met Mr. Muller in the express office the morning of sailing, about half an hour before the tender was to take the passengers to the ship.
Example #2
The writer had many thoughts in this line suggested to him by an incident, with which he was connected, in the life of George Muller.
Example #3
After the sinking of the Ville du Havre, with some two hundred of her passengers, the rest were taken up by the Loch Earn, from which most of them were afterwards transferred to the Trimountain.
Example #4
THE RESCUE FROM THE VILLE DU HAVRE, AND THE LOCH EARN.
Example #5
In the year 1735 a voyage across the Atlantic was a very different thing from what it is in this year of grace 1904.
Example #6
Then weeks were consumed in the mere effort to get away from the British Isles, the breeze sometimes permitting the small sailing vessels to slip from one port to another, and then holding them prisoner for days before another mile could be gained.