Wallack in a sentence

The word "wallack" in a example sentences. Learn the definition of wallack and how to use it in a sentence.

This website focus on english words and example sentences, so everyone can learn how to use them. Easily browse through english vocabulary, listen the sentences or copy them.

Definition of Wallack

  • See Wallachian.

How to use wallack in a sentence. Wallack pronunciation.

Trajan sent certain legions to form military colonies in Dacia; and the present Wallacks and Moldavians are, to a certain extent, the descendants of the Roman soldiers, who married the women of the country, I say to a certain extent, for the Sclavonian element both in blood and language, seems to prevail.
play
copy
I hate the mad Wallacks.
play
copy
There is a good play on at Wallack's.
play
copy
Stocks fell, but the theatres were the fuller; Joseph Jefferson at Winter Garden, Wallack at his own theatre, "The Seven Sisters" at Laura Keene's, drew unsatisfied crowds, galloping headlong on the heels of pleasure.
play
copy
If you don't believe it, go to WALLACK'S and see him.
play
copy
He plays "FRITZ" at WALLACK'S every evening, and the entertainment is something of this nature.
play
copy
The idea of Mr. WALLACK permitting this negro minstrelsy in his theatre.
play
copy
Shall we cry down a talented and promising young actor simply because he has been a minstrel, and now has the audacity to play at WALLACK'S?
play
copy
The interference of her friends prevented the consummation of a wedding; but his escapade formed the subject of a book, afterwards dramatized, and acted at Wallack's Theatre.
play
copy
The consequence is "Paul Kauvar" must stand representative of the eighteen-eighty fervour of Lester Wallack, A.M. Palmer, and Daly, who were in the Mackaye tradition.
play
copy
Author of the following plays, with their dates of first production: "Fantine" (Detroit, Mich., 1864); "Saratoga" (New York: Fifth Avenue Theatre, December 21, 1870); "Diamonds" (New York: Fifth Avenue Theatre, September 26, 1872); "Moorcroft; or, The Double Wedding" (New York: Fifth Avenue Theatre, October 17, 1874); "Lilian's Last Love" (Chicago: Hooley's Theatre, September 4, 1877); "Hurricanes" (Chicago: Hooley's Theatre, May 27, 1878); "Old Love Letters" (New York: Park Theatre, August 31, 1878); "The Banker's Daughter," being a revision of "Lilian's Last Love" (New York: Union Square Theatre, September 30, 1878); "Wives," being an adaptation from Moliere (New York: Daly's Theatre, October 18, 1879); "Fun in the Green-room" (New York: Booth's Theatre, April 10, 1882); "The Young Mrs. Winthrop" (New York: Madison Square Theatre, October 9, 1882); "One of Our Girls" (New York: Lyceum Theatre, November 10, 1885); "Met by Chance" (New York: Lyceum Theatre, January 11, 1887); "The Henrietta" (New York: Union Square Theatre, September 26, 1887); "Baron Rudolph," first named "Rudolph von Hallenstein" (New York: Fourteenth Street Theatre, October 25, 1887); "Shenandoah" (New York: Star Theatre, September 9, 1889); "Aristocracy" (New York: Palmer's Theatre, November 14, 1892); "Peter Stuyvesant," in collaboration with Brander Matthews (New York: Wallack's Theatre, October 2, 1899).
play
copy
Author of the following plays, with their dates of first production: "Editha's Burglar," with Mrs. F. H. Burnett (St. Louis: Pope's Theatre, July 1, 1884); "The Burglar" (Boston: Park Theatre, June, 1888); "A Man of the World" (New York: Madison Square Theatre, October 30, 1889); "Afterthoughts" (New York: Madison Square Theatre, November 24, 1890); "Reckless Temple" (New York: Standard Theatre, October 27, 1890); "Alabama" (New York: Madison Square Theatre, April 1, 1891); "Colonel Carter of Cartersville," from the novel by F. Hopkinson Smith (New York: Palmer's Theatre, March 22,1892); "Holly-Tree Inn" (New York: Union Square Theatre, April 11, 1892); "In Mizzoura" (Chicago: Hooley's Theatre, August, 1893); "New Blood" (New York: Palmer's Theatre, September 19, 1894; previously in Chicago); "The Man Upstairs" (New York: Hoyt's Theatre, April 9, 1895); "The Capitol" (New York: Standard Theatre, September 9, 1895); "That Overcoat" (1898); "The Hoosier Doctor" (New York: Fourteenth Street Theatre, April 18, 1898); "The Meddler" (New York: Wallack's Theatre, September 1, 1898); "Arizona" (Chicago: Grand Opera House, June 12, 1899); "Oliver Goldsmith" (New York: Fifth Avenue Theatre, March 19, 1900); "On the Quiet" (New York: Hoyt's Theatre, February 11, 1901); "Colorado" (New York: Palmer's Theatre, January 12, 1902); "Soldiers of Fortune," from the novel by Richard Harding Davis (New York: Savoy Theatre, March 17, 1902); "The Earl of Pawtucket" (New York: Madison Square Theatre, February 5, 1903); "The Other Girl" (New York: Criterion Theatre, December 23, 1903); "Mrs. Leffingwell's Boots" (New York: Savoy Theatre, January 11, 1905); "The Education of Mr. Pipp," from pictures by Charles Dana Gibson, (New York: Liberty Theatre, February 20, 1905); "Delancey" (New York: Empire Theatre, September 4, 1905); "The Embassy Ball" (New York: Daly's Theatre, March 5, 1906); "The Ranger" (New York: Wallack's Theatre, September 2, 1907); "The Witching Hour" (New York: Hackett's Theatre, November 18, 1907); "The Harvest Moon" (New York: Garrick Theatre, October 18, 1909); "The Member from Ozark" (Detroit, Mich., Opera House, 1910); "As a Man Thinks" (New York: 39th Street Theatre, March 13, 1911); "The Model" (New York: Harris Theatre, August 31, 1912); "Mere Man" (New York: Harris Theatre, November 25, 1912); "Indian Summer" (New York: Criterion Theatre, October 27, 1913); "Rio Grande" (New York: Empire Theatre, April 4, 1916); "The Copperhead" (Hartford, Conn., January 22, 1918); "Palmy Days" (New York: The Playhouse, October 27, 1919); "Under the Bough," previously called "The Blue Devil" and "Speak of the Devil" (Boston: Colonial Theatre, May 31, 1920).
play
copy
The following condensed version of this play is offered to the readers of PUNCHINELLO, with the assurance that, though it may be a little more coherent than the unabridged edition, it is a faithful picture of the sort of thing that Mr. BOUCICAULT, aided and abetted by Mr. WALLACK, thinks proper to offer to the public.
play
copy
How we have outraged theatrical proprieties by applauding WALLACK and BOOTH and DAVENPORT!
play
copy

Examples of Wallack

Example #1
A strange mixture of Latin and Sclavonian-they themselves being a mixed race of Romans and Sclavonians.
Example #2
What language do they speak?
Example #3
I have, and glad I was to get out of it.
Example #4
Why do you call them mad?
Example #5
Here is a five-dollar bill.
Example #6
I shall be glad to see you two intimate.